Blown Covers

  RAW news, TOON Books and New Yorker covers you were never meant to see
Posts tagged "Monday"

Jean-Jacques Sempé - with his talent for finding the private quiet moment in the big busy world - is one of the great masters of beach images. 

Slather on that sunscreen and slip on those flip flops! Summer is here and every good New Yorker knows the only way to survive summer in the city is to leave it. In New York you can take the subway to the coney island shore or you can have your chauffeur drive you to the Hamptons. But whether you take a private jet or the Q train to get there, the Atlantic is still just as cold. Perhaps that equalizing factor is part of why the New Yorker runs several beach images every year. Shake the sand of your sketchbooks and start drawing! We look forward to seeing your ideas. 

- By R. Taylor

- By Ian Falconer

- By Carter Goodrich

- By Roz Chast

To enter each week’s contest, please send sketches on this week’s theme. Use the submissions page or email submissions to blowncovers@gmail.com. I prefer sketches to finished work and good ideas to good drawings. Please send files in as jpegs under 1mb, and label the file with firstname.lastname. The deadline is Thursday at noon (NYC time). The themes on the Blown Covers website closely mirror what I suggest to the New Yorker artists I already work with. This blog and contest are informal and not affiliated with the magazine but I’m always on the lookout for ideas. Please keep submissions confidential in case they are selected for later publication. The winning sketch (according to my own subjective whims) will be posted here on Friday

— “Soda Noir,” this week’s New Yorker cover by Owen Smith (read more here)

— “Soda Noir,” this week’s New Yorker cover by Owen Smith (read more here)

Fireworks, barbecues, American flags, folding chairs —  it may not be exactly how our Founding Fathers celebrated, but it feels like the traditions are old as time. July 4th is a celebration of summer and of America - which makes it a good time to poke fun at America too (see Christoph Niemann’s covers below). How will you be celebrating this year? Pull out your red white and blue crayons and get sketching! (Perspectives from international artists more than welcome.)

- By Harry Bliss

- By R. Sikoryak

- By Christoph Niemann

- By Christoph Niemann

To enter each week’s contest, please send sketches on this week’s theme. Use the submissions page or email submissions to blowncovers@gmail.com. I prefer sketches to finished work and good ideas to good drawings. Please send files in as jpegs under 1mb, and label the file with firstname.lastname. The deadline is Thursday at noon (NYC time). The themes on the Blown Covers website closely mirror what I suggest to the New Yorker artists I already work with. This blog and contest are informal and not affiliated with the magazine but I’m always on the lookout for ideas. Please keep submissions confidential in case they are selected for later publication. The winning sketch (according to my own subjective whims) will be posted here on Friday

Two July 4th covers by the wonderful William Steig - He drew the first in 1937, when he was 30 years old (and still a boy at heart) and the second in 1982, when he was 75 years old. 

“If you had told me when I began that I would have my work on a museum wall, I would have thought, ‘What’s happened to civilization?’ ” says Daniel Clowes, the artist behind this week’s Science Fiction Issue cover, “Crashing the Gate.” A retrospective of Clowes’s work is on view at the Oakland Museum of California.
“It feels like I snuck in a museum through a side door somehow. For all the painters and sculptors I went to art school with, to slip into a museum through comics might seem very clever and dishonest.” He laughs. “But now that I’m at the top, I can only go down. it’s hard not to feel like, ‘They gave me my retirement party.’ A big career retrospective seems like a thing you should only get when you’re seventy-five or so.”

“If you had told me when I began that I would have my work on a museum wall, I would have thought, ‘What’s happened to civilization?’ ” says Daniel Clowes, the artist behind this week’s Science Fiction Issue cover, “Crashing the Gate.” A retrospective of Clowes’s work is on view at the Oakland Museum of California.

“It feels like I snuck in a museum through a side door somehow. For all the painters and sculptors I went to art school with, to slip into a museum through comics might seem very clever and dishonest.” He laughs. “But now that I’m at the top, I can only go down. it’s hard not to feel like, ‘They gave me my retirement party.’ A big career retrospective seems like a thing you should only get when you’re seventy-five or so.”

June weddings are a tradition that dates back to ancient Roman times. According to my brief internet research, Juno, Roman Goddess of Marriage, brought prosperity and wealth to all those who married in her month. “Mary in May, and rue the day,” an old proverb goes. New Yorker June wedding covers are a tradition that date back nearly as long - to the second year of the magazine’s existence, in 1926. What would your June wedding cover be? Put on those tuxedos and gowns and start sketching! (Full submission instructions at the bottom of this post)

Here are some published New Yorker covers to inspire you:

- By M. Scott Miller

- By Mark Ulriksen

- By Lou Romano 

To enter each week’s contest, please send sketches on this week’s theme. Use the submissions page or email submissions to blowncovers@gmail.com. I prefer sketches to finished work and good ideas to good drawings. Please send files in as jpegs under 1mb, and label the file with firstname.lastname. The deadline is Thursday at noon (NYC time). The themes on the Blown Covers website closely mirror what I suggest to the New Yorker artists I already work with. This blog and contest are informal and not affiliated with the magazine but I’m always on the lookout for ideas. Please keep submissions confidential in case they are selected for later publication. The winning sketch (according to my own subjective whims) will be posted here on Friday

Everywhere Nadja goes in her neighborhood in Brooklyn, she sees Dads out with their kids: pushing their strollers, buying them ice-cream, taking them to the park. Fathers even stole the show in Chris Ware’s recent Mother’s Day cover. How would you depict modern fatherhood? Put on those Father’s Day ties and start sketching! (Full submission guidelines at the bottom of this post)

Here are a few published New Yorker covers for inspiration:

-By Leonard Dove

- By HA (Bob Zoell)

- By Charles Burns

-By William Joyce

To enter each week’s contest, please send sketches on this week’s theme. Use the submissions page or email submissions to blowncovers@gmail.com. I prefer sketches to finished work and good ideas to good drawings. Please send files in as jpegs under 1mb, and label the file with firstname.lastname. The deadline is Thursday at noon (NYC time). The themes on the Blown Covers website closely mirror what I suggest to the New Yorker artists I already work with. This blog and contest are informal and not affiliated with the magazine but I’m always on the lookout for ideas. Please keep submissions confidential in case they are selected for later publication. The winning sketch (according to my own subjective whims) will be posted here on Friday

“I was walking my dog in the park, thinking about graduation—just that whole notion of a big crowd of people all faced with the same situation, all these graduates going out in the world now, at the same time,” says Mark Ulriksen, the artist behind “Adrift.” “And I was thinking, ‘What other kinds of big crowds do you see getting together all with the same purpose?’ Penguins. And they’re adrift, just like these kids.”Read more on The New Yorker’s Culture Desk Blog

“I was walking my dog in the park, thinking about graduation—just that whole notion of a big crowd of people all faced with the same situation, all these graduates going out in the world now, at the same time,” says Mark Ulriksen, the artist behind “Adrift.” “And I was thinking, ‘What other kinds of big crowds do you see getting together all with the same purpose?’ Penguins. And they’re adrift, just like these kids.”

Read more on The New Yorkers Culture Desk Blog

Between Obama’s historic endorsement of gay marriage and allegations that Mitt Romney bullied a gay classmate in Prep school, this seems like as good a time as any to discuss homosexuality in America. Plus, Françoise will be looking for June wedding covers soon. Commenting on a minority group is tricky but please try not to censor your sketches. Françoise tells her New Yorker artists “Think of me as your priest.” If you don’t let yourself go too far, you often won’t go far enough. So pull out your rainbow crayon set and start sketching! (Full submission guidelines at the bottom of this post, first time contributors encouraged)

Here are some past New Yorker covers to inspire you:

- By Jacques de Loustal (when this ran in 1994, it caused a huge stir. But now, it would just be an illustration of the NY times wedding section)

- By Barry Blitt (this was also one of The New Yorker’s most controversial covers at the time)

- By Barry Blitt

To enter each week’s contest, please send sketches on this week’s theme. Use the submissions page or email submissions to blowncovers@gmail.com. I prefer sketches to finished work and good ideas to good drawings. Please send files in as jpegs under 1mb, and label the file with firstname.lastname. The deadline is Thursday at noon (NYC time). The themes on the Blown Covers website closely mirror what I suggest to the New Yorker artists I already work with. This blog and contest are informal and not affiliated with the magazine but I’m always on the lookout for ideas. Please keep submissions confidential in case they are selected for later publication. The winning sketch (according to my own subjective whims) will be posted here on Friday

The winner and first runner-up of this week’s contest will also win free tickets to this event at the 92Y in NYC with Francoise Mouly, Art Spiegelman, Barry Blitt and Roz Chast and get to meet the artists. 

Next week’s New Yorker Cover. Get the story from artist Bob Staake at the New Yorker.com

Next week’s New Yorker Cover. Get the story from artist Bob Staake at the New Yorker.com

It’s that time of year again, when the eager young best and brightest line up in strange robes for a piece of paper they’ve worked years to earn. Nadja remembers her own graduation fondly - it was 2009, the economy had hit new lows, and all the young bankers-to-be had had their early job offers rescinded. “No one knows what they’re doing now,” she said cheerfully, “which is great for me, since I’ve never known what I was doing.” What does it mean to be graduating into today’s world? Pull out your pencils, sketch on the backs of your diplomas and send me your ideas! (Full submission guidelines at the bottom of this post).

Here are some published New Yorker covers to inspire you:

- Constantin Alajalov

 

- Leonard Dove (the joke here would have been that a woman had gone to college)


- Barry Blitt

- Carter Goodrich

-Daniel Clowes

To enter each week’s contest, please send sketches on this week’s theme. Use the submissions page or email submissions to blowncovers@gmail.com. I prefer sketches to finished work and good ideas to good drawings.Please send files in as jpegs under 1mb, and label the file with firstname.lastname.The deadline is Thursday at noon (NYC time). The themes on the Blown Covers website closely mirror what I suggest to the New Yorker artists I already work with. This blog and contest are informal and not affiliated with the magazine but I’m always on the lookout for ideas. Please keep submissions confidential in case they are selected for later publication. The winning sketch (according to my own subjective whims) will be posted here on Friday

THE PRIZE: The winner and first runner-up of this week’s contest will win free tickets to this event at the 92Y in NYC with Francoise Mouly, Art Spiegelman, Barry Blitt and Roz Chast and get to meet the artists. 




Behind the scenes with
New Yorker
art editor and TOON Books Editorial Director
Françoise Mouly

and with
Nadja Spiegelman

twitter.com/FrancoiseMouly